Kinder – Bueno! (A two day circumnavigation of Kinder Scout and the Edale Valley)

Once a year, global pandemics allowing (:-o), a university friend and I get together for a walking weekend. Ahead of us getting to meet up this autumn he commented on my wild walking posts and how this year he’s like to join me on one of these rather than our normal pair of day hikes. I’ve had an augmented version of the circumnavigation of Kinder Scout on my to-do list for some time. The forecast for the Saturday looked ideal, the Sunday less so, but we packed our waterproofs and headed to Derbyshire to see what we would find.

Kinder Circuit Map

Finding an overnight parking spot in Edale is a challenge, but my research suggested that Barber Booth should work out. We could and should have arrived earlier than we did, but were lucky and found a space under the railway bridge. From here we set off towards Edale with the intention of heading up to Grindslow Knoll as our ascent onto the Kinder Plateau. We were talking too much and were in Edale before we knew it, so instead we followed the overly popular path alongside Grinds Brook to the top. Wow was this busy – a far from wild beginning to this wild walk.

Spoiler alert – I loved this walk and plan to do it again out-of-season so need to be more alert next time and even consider following the path up Crowden Brook instead to avoid the crowds and to enjoy more ‘edge’ and less valley. The first of the iconic rock formations soon greeted us

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We continued around the edge of the plateau in an anticlockwise direction as this aim was to get the distance just right to finish the day on “The Edge” above Black Ashop Moor – SK08,89. We had glorious sunshine affording beautiful views of the various edges and down into the respective valleys which envelop Kinder. As I had hoped, and researched, the Edge-Path remained dry and firm underfoot for the whole day, a great contrast to the boggy peat interior of Kinder.

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We harvested our water for the evening at Fair Brook but didn’t hang around because of the midges. A significant plus point with the Sawyer Squeeze filter is that as well as removing harmful bacteria etc it also strips the peat taste from water such as that which runs off of Kinder. The original idea was to camp on “The Edge” but I reaped the benefit of my walking partner being a geologist who reviewed the map and said that the ground would be expected to be soft and wet there (and what do you know, when we got there the following morning he was absolutely right!) so we looked for a spot on Fairbrook Naze instead and found a great pitch. After dinner we were also blessed with a huge Harvest Moon. My photo doesn’t do it justice.

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After a mild night we woke to low cloud, however this had lifted above the plateau by the time we set off at 0800. The weather forecast suggested a high likelihood of moderate rain. In practice we got around 40 min of light rain, after which the sun broke through and gave us a day considerably ahead of expectations. The sunshine gave us great views around the horseshoe and down into the Edale valley itself.

Whilst having out lunch on the far side of Lords Seat, Mam Tor looked less like the piece of anatomy after which it is named and more like a hedgehog with people making up the spines. So whilst the original plan was to finish on Back Tor we chose not to queue again and headed back to the car. By the time we got there was have covered a very respectable 12.6 miles and enjoyed a most excellent weekend of walking, talking and splendid views. This is a walk I would certainly hope to repeat this coming winter, hopefully when there is snow on the ground.

Kinder Circuit Map

‘bent over the Pennines 5th and Final Day : Holmfirth to Ilam – 60 miles

Life has rather got in the way of blogging, so the conclusion of my tour notes has been somewhat delayed. For this, dear reader, I apologise. However the distractions have all been good ones! When I left off I had just reached Holmfirth, stopping some 10-12 miles before my planned end point because day four had proved to be the meanest stretch that the Pennines would have to offer. The Holme Valley Campsite proved to be very good. That it was so quiet was not be expected from the map, falling as it does between two busy A roads. However not only was it a haven of peace, the staff were fabulous and hospitable too. Also their new shower block was nothing short of the state of the art – and no coin slots for the showers. What a welcome change compared to our time in Barnoldswick.

early_LOTSW_5Rolling back into the town centre was an easy start, but Holme Moss was there waiting for me. Once again the initial climb was very steep, but soon settled out to a manageable 1:7. The TDF went this way, but took the A6024 over the fell which was (once again) a slightly easier route than NCN 68. If I were to do it again, I’d follow the A road, as the support van reported that this was a pretty quiet road even at around 5 pm. On top of the fell it was a little misty, the first less than perfect weather of the trip. However I was soon down from height and barrelling down towards the Woodhead Pass (A628). Luckily I joined this on a downhill section (heading West) and so was able to keep up a respectable 38-40 mph and was thus not so much slower than the trucks. There were plenty of those and I was glad to get to the Torside Resovoir and onto the B road on the other side. The ride down into Glossop was both glorious and all but traffic free. I didn’t stop in the town, nothing invited me to do so and it was busy with traffic as usual. The really steep hills were now behind me, but there were still a couple of significant climbs ahead. The countryside rolled and swayed as I entered Derbyshire and apart from one navigational error it was an easy ride to my lunch spot. The wind had built up, and whilst this is not a big issue peddling a ‘bent, it did mean seeking cover for my lunch. The Pack Horse Inn filled my beer stomach nicely, and after a rest it was time to hit the road again. My hope (which turned out to be realized) was that this should turn out to be the easiest afternoon of the trip.   In terms of what I had seen up until this point, really there was only one more ‘real hill’ to get over that day. This was just outside Buxton. I deviated away from NCN 68 as my advice had told me that ‘off road’ section was far too rough for me. Sticking to the A5004 I thought I had ‘hit the wall’. Instead it turns out that Long Hill is aptly named. I could see that I was on the side of a hill, but not until the road snaked back on itself did I get to see where I had come from… And this told me that I was not running out of steam, I was instead battling up a very long [if gentle] climb. This was finally rewarded by a sweeping decent into Buxton and a trip to Gregg’s to try out a couple of their Danish Pastries. Two for the price of one, it would have been rude not to! Mrs W and the support van arrived in town just after me and together we had a fun conversation with a cycling cleric who wanted to know more about my Metabike. What a great chap he was and I was buoyed up for the final leg with the assurance that ‘there are no more big hills South of here.’

The Quiet Woman PH

10 miles outside of Buxton I joined the Monsal Trail. The surface was much better than I remembered from my last trip here in 2005. Perhaps it had been improved? The dry weather will have helped. Now the challenge was on; would I be able to complete the final 20 miles before dinner time / my own personal energy store ran low? A nice flat level trail really is ‘bent country, and apart from negotiating around dawdling grockels I was managing 20-22 mph all the way. This suggested that I would get to Ilam, my end destination within the hour. This is in fact exactly what happened. Whilst lacking in geological drama, the rail-bed route made up for this with bucolic views seen at high speed, or at least what is high speed for a long distance tourist at the end of a long day.

Our final campsite proved to be the delight we hoped it would be. The NT site at Ilam Hall. A little luxury and the chance for a couple of days family time at the end of the tour.

Ilam HallSo would I recommend NCN 68? A qualified yes… …the scenery was outstanding, the route quiet (apart from the Woodhead Pass!) and the sense of achievement massive. I’m glad I got the chance to do it ‘supported’ however and did not have the weight of touring gear. Given the hills on days three and four, very short days would have been in order had I had this weight with me. I would have added a day. However I had no weight, so for me it as an excellent route.  Pleasingly also, I can counter the misconception that ‘bents cannot climb.   It is true that a lot of ‘bents are built more for comfort rather than speed, but there are at least two designs out there which have the same / very similar mechanical efficiency to the standard diamond frame design and the Metabike is one of those. So it was a great route for a great bike – luckily I was on just such a machine and had great weather thrown in for good measure.